ABIDING MYSTERIES OF OUR WORLD

Abiding mystery #1: Does the fiddler assume that everyone knows how to fiddle? Does the baker of cakes suppose that everyone knows how to bake cakes? The answer, of course, is no. Why then do “tech people,” as evidenced in their persistent brandishing of unnecessarily inscrutable jargon, so often assume that non-tech people are tech people?

 

☆☆☆

 

The Language of Bears is a smart, literate, odd, and skillfully written tour de force filled with biblical, mythical, and cultural allusions. Peopled with a cast of wonderfully quirky characters, the plot takes a number of surprising and singular twists while referencing everything from Greek mythology and King Arthur to A.A. Milne’s gloomy donkey, Eeyore. In addition, Eidswick displays a brilliant command of dialogue, and his prose is poetic and filled with striking imagery: “The night sky was spotted with clouds, luminous bruises spread over the stars.” Strange, funny, and poignant, the story deftly wields this eccentric parable to examine a variety of philosophical, religious, and existential questions, such as the dichotomy between deeming the world as evil and worthy of punishment versus viewing life as a demonstration of God’s goodness. Witty, serious, and original, this stunning tale should attract anyone who delights in an intellectually stimulating read.”

Kirkus Reviews

Available in paperback, Kindle, and Kindle Unlimited.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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